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LGBTQ Aging

A 2020 Gallup study observed Americans’ identification as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT), by generation. The findings report that only 1.3% of the Traditionalist generation (born before 1946) and 2.0% of Baby Boomers (born 1946-1964) identify as LGBT. This number increases dramatically over the generations, reaching 15.9% for Generation Z (born 1997-2002). The question is – does the higher percentage of younger Americans reflect a true shift in sexual orientation? Or is it simply reflecting a greater willingness to identify as LGBT? Although those who make up the younger generations were born into a world where huge progress has been made in the gay rights movement, the older generations of the LGBTQ community experienced much less accepting times. It wasn’t until 1961 that Illinois became the first state in the United States to get rid of its sodomy law. It then took another ten years before 20 more states followed their lead. So even though Traditionalists and Baby Boomers were around to witness the progress that has been made, many may still have the mindset that society will not accept them for who they are. It is this fear of discrimination that may play a part in their hesitation to seek the help and support they need as they near the end of their life. As a result, the LGBTQ community has been historically underserved by hospice. A 2011 study reported that 20% of LGBTQ seniors that were surveyed did not even reveal their sexual orientation to their primary physician for fear of discrimination. Beyond hospice services for the patient, their grieving partner often misses out on bereavement support as they care for their partner in their final months and days.

Resources for the Aging LGBTQ Community

Hospices are now working harder than ever to understand the specific needs of the aging LGBTQ community and to do all they can to accommodate those needs. The National Resource Center on LGBT Aging is a resource center focused on improving the quality of services and support offered to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and/or transgender older adults. Their website includes resources that cover a variety of topics, including end of life decisions. You can also use the interactive map to find resources in your area. No one should miss out on the benefits of hospice care for any reason, especially for fear of discrimination.

Happy Pride Month!

June is…

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month. This month-long celebration provides the opportunity to focus on raising awareness for the 50 million people worldwide living with Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s disease is a degenerative brain disease and the most common form of dementia. It causes a slow decline in memory, thinking, and reasoning skills. Schedule an appointment with your doctor if you notice any of these ten signs and symptoms:
  1. Memory loss that disrupts daily life
  2. Challenges in planning or solving problems
  3. Difficulty completing familiar tasks
  4. Confusion with time or place
  5. Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships
  6. New problems with words in speaking or writing
  7. Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps
  8. Decreased or poor judgment
  9. Withdrawal from work or social activities
  10. Changes in mood and personality
Visit the website for the Alzheimer’s Association for more information on these signs and symptoms to be on the lookout for.

Take Action

There are several ways to get involved in Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month! On June 20th, join the cause by celebrating ‘The Longest Day’ through a fundraising activity of your choice! There are a variety of ways to get involved, including virtually and in-person. So put on your purple gear, share your story of why you go purple, and join the fight to #EndAlz!

Soak Up the Sun…Safely

Summer is just around the corner, which mean barbeques, swimming, and SUN! And while most of us enjoy getting outside and soaking up a little Vitamin D, it is important to remember to be safe when heading outside into the sun. Per the American Academy of Dermatology Association, skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States, and unprotected UV exposure is the most preventable risk factor for skin cancer. With that being said, it is important to follow these three steps to protect your skin:

Signs of Skin Cancer

Finding skin cancer early, before it has spread, makes it much easier to treat. If you know what to look for, you can often spot warning signs early on. Doctors recommend checking your own skin about once a month using a full-length mirror in a well-lit room. You can also use a hand mirror to check areas that are harder to see. Melanoma is one of the deadliest forms of skin cancer, while basal and squamous cell skin cancers are more common but are usually very treatable. The American Cancer Society’s website discusses these types of skin cancers and what to look out for.

Melanoma

Use the “ABCDE” rule to look for some of the common signs of melanoma:

Basal Cell Carcinomas

These types of skin cancers typically grow on parts of the body that get the most sun, such as the face, head, and neck. However, they can still show up anywhere. Here is what you should look for:

Squamous Cell Carcinomas

Similarly to basal cell carcinomas, these typically grow on the parts of the body that get the most sun but can appear anywhere. You should look for:

Talk to Your Doctor

Although these are good examples of what to look for, some skin cancers may look different than these descriptions. It is important to talk to your doctor about anything you are concerned about, such as new spots and other skin changes.

Benefits of Physical Activity

Today is National Senior Health and Fitness Day, making it a perfect day to focus on the importance of exercise. There are plenty of benefits of physical activity for people of any age, but let’s highlight some specifically for seniors:

Exercises for Seniors

We already know the importance of physical activity, but we also have to remember it is equally important to be safe while exercising. This means choosing exercises that work for you based on your age and physical fitness, while also considering any injuries or physical limitations that may impact your ability. It is also important to talk with your physician before jumping right into a new exercise routine. Some of the best exercises for older adults include: You can also check out this exercise plan for seniors that Healthline put together!

A Healthy Diet

Exercising is only part of what it takes to live a healthy lifestyle. A healthy diet is another very important part, and the definition of healthy eating changes a little as you age. The National Council on Aging put together a list of six tips for eating healthy as you get older.
  1. Know what a healthy plate looks like
  2. Look for important nutrients, such as lean protein, fruits and veggies, whole grains, and low-fat dairy
  3. Read the nutrition facts label
  4. Use recommended servings
  5. Stay hydrated
  6. Stretch your food budget

Get Started

So let today be the first day of a healthier lifestyle! Check out these additional resources to help you get started.

Better Hearing and Speech Month Facts

Each year, Better Hearing and Speech Month in May provides an opportunity to raise awareness about communication disorders and other hearing and speech problems. The event also serves as a reminder to people to get their hearing checked. Early identification and intervention is very important, and getting your hearing checked is the first step! According to the CDC’s website, the World Health Organization’s first World Report on Hearing found that:

Building Connections

“Building Connections” is the theme for 2021! You can find a variety of resources, broken down by week, on the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association’s website. Week 4’s focus is “Summer Skill Building, Hearing Protection for School-Aged Children.” Below are some examples of the resources available. Be sure to check out the ASHA’s website for more!

Early Identification

And remember to get your hearing checked as a first step in addressing any potential issues. Early identification is important!

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